Tag Archives: Northanger Abbey

Jane Austen: An Altered View

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In the period December 2016 to July 2017, I reread all the completed novels of my favourite author Jane Austen (here after dubbed JA). Last year I created a reading challenge, designating each month for a particular theme. I choose December for Jane Austen books because her birthday would be on the 16th, a day I call Jane Austen Day. As you can tell from my July date in my opening, I could not complete my JA challenge in the assigned month thus I continued until Sense and Sensibility ushered the curtains on my JA journey. It is important to note that during my sensuous readathon, I noticed the growth of the Bicentenary Celebrations of JA’s death. I immediately drifted into that ‘huh mode’; Why the joy for the death of the author who gave us the plots and twists that we love?

It took a while to sink in but eventually I had to make myself understand that when many are creating workshops, parties, museum tours, lectures, tea parties, book clubs and all the other fascinating endeavours, people are celebrating JA and her novels.  I have seen an increase in the number of news articles specifically for JA separate from the usual JA dedications. It means that more persons learn of the author’s writings and setting time aside to reread not one novel but her entire collection. It is admirable and I am ecstatic that every time I social media (yes I made it a verb), there is an increase traffic in quiz, blog posts. JA writings are here to stay and I am happy to do my part in keeping her stories alive!

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When Writing A Book Review Goes Wrong

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Crying, the only expression my face held back.
I just wanted and needed to cry.
Cry because after spending two days working,
On a book review of Northanger Abbey that cried
My sentiments towards Catherine Morland, Jane Austen
And Henry Tilney I plundered by accidentally cutting those paragraphs instead of copying.
No autocorrect, no instant arrow to reverse on InkPad Notes.
Gone are those words, gone into an imaginary Recycle Bin.

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Heart

Source: — highreshdwallpapers.com

“Where the heart is really attached, I know very well how little one can be pleased with the attention of anybody else. Everything is so insipid, so uninteresting, that does not relate to the beloved object! I can perfectly comprehend your feelings.”

Jane Austen Northanger Abbey


I know Isabella, I know the feeling. It is like the solar system suddenly begins rotating around “the beloved object.” When the phone cries and you are really expecting word from “the beloved object,” every message and phone call from someone else makes you groan  in frustration.


 

 

Heart Talk [Quote]

Appreciating Jane Austen

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Jane_Austen

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Since today(December 16) would be my favourite author’s birthday if she was alive, I believe it is proper to have a review of the main seven novels.

The complete set is one of my favourites read, I love me some Jane Austen.

I love her writing became of the way she merges her story with excellent scenery writing. She writes her scenes so well, I can feel and see the atmosphere at Lyme in Persuasion, I can see the beauty of the surroundings of the cottage when the Dashwoods moves in Sense and Sensibility. The landscape was so beautiful when Catherine and the Thorpes went sightseeing and the oh so lovely scene where Henry Tilney and Catherine Morland were exchanging words on novel-writing in Northanger Abbey.

The age of the writing also draws me to Austen’s world. I love reading about people in a different time period from the 20st and 21th century. The older the setting the better, 18th and 19th century is just an interesting period where society etiquettes were so class structured. It is one aspect that shows up in all her novels. The Bertrams took Fanny into the family but she was kept on a class beneath Edmund, Julia, Tom and Maria in Mansfield Park. The Elliots with excepting Anne accepted Captain W into their circles in Bath only when he amassed a fortune on the sea in Persuasion.

Austen’s characters are some of the wackiest and best in English Literature. I am glad she did not shy away from characters who would make women blush behind their fans in their morning rooms. Maria Bertram and Henry Crawford from Mansfield park, Lady Susan Vernon from Lady Susan, Willoughby from Sense and Sensibility, Lydia Bennet and George Wickham from Pride and Prejudice. I am also appreciated of the men who were so devoted and loved their women: Captain W, Colonel Brandon, Mr. Darcy. The comical ones also added laughter and fits of vexation for me: Mr. Collins were just so ridiculous, I could not help but laugh at him in P&P but I just wish Mary in Persuasion would shut up and go away.

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Love or Lust: She Loves Me, She Loves Me Not?

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A tale of she loves me, she loves me not

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“All have been, or at least all have believed themselves to be, in danger from the pursuit of someone whom they wished to avoid; and all have been anxious for the attentions of someone whom they wished to please.”  Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey

 

You read the above quote and you moaned, laughed or grinned. Be honest. I remember reading an inspirational note on Facebook a long time ago [yes Facebook]. I will try to summarize it as close to the original post as possible.

It said: “Lying to someone is wrong and sad but lying to yourself is an absolute tragedy.”

Therefore, I aim to speak the truth and nothing but the truth in this matter of the heart.

Jane Austen scribbled the above quote in the 18th century but it is applicable for all humans in the 21st century and it will stay true in the 30th century. One moment we are running away in fright from  someone who dote on us. You may murmur in frustration:

Will you please stop calling and texting me?”

“What is wrong with him/her, what part of leave me alone will he/she not understands?”

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