Tag Archives: English literature

Buzz Words That Make You Buy| Top 5 Wednesday

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Top 5 Wednesday

Hey all people, happy Wednesday and greetings in the name of another Top 5 Wednesday. Don’t you look forward to this day of the week? It is definitely a chance to read so many opinions on a new book topic. This week we take a look at favourite buzz words, you know that key word which make you “yes this one is for the buying/getting.” This week Top 5 Wednesday sums up my favourite types of books to read.

 

Let us dive into it:

 

1. Jane Austen

What? Did somebody say Jane Austen? Where? How? Why?

That name is one guarantee to make me stop and stare. Although yours truly is a bit cautious now to read the summary because of earlier burns by some authors taking Jane Austen name and books and turning  it into a sieving heap of nonsense. However, in the past the name Jane Austen played peek-a -boo through the book cover with my book spirit, seconds later: myself paying for books at the cashier sans reading even the summary at the back.

 

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Charles Dickens’s Mr. Micawber

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Charles Dickens

“As illustrated in a 1912 edition of the book” via en.wikipedia.org

Did You Know?

Many posit the view that one of the character of the book David Copperfield   written by Charles Dickens is a portrayal of his father, John Dickens. As a boy Charles father became a ward at a debtors prison and the character  Mr. Micawber suffers the same fate. In addition, they both fit are good-hearted people but not capable to handle the ups and downs of the world. Hence,  John Dickens seems like an inspiration for Mr. Micawber.

The End

Works Cited

BBC. (2014). Charles Dickens (1812-1870). Retrieved November 17, 2015, from BBC: http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/dickens_charles.shtml

Info, C. D. (n.d.). David Copperfield by Charles Dickens. Retrieved November 17, 2015, from Charles Dickens Info: http://www.charlesdickensinfo.com/novels/david-copperfield/

Kehe, M. ( 2012 , February 7). Charles Dickens: His 10 most memorable characters. Retrieved November 17, 2015, from The Christian Science Monitor: http://www.csmonitor.com/Books/2012/0207/Charles-Dickens-His-10-most-memorable-characters/Mr.-Micawber-of-David-Copperfield

Wikipedia. ( 2015, September 15). Wilkins Micawber. Retrieved November 17, 2015, from Wikipedia : The Free Encyclopedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilkins_Micawber

 

 

Jane Austen’s Names: Riddles, Persons, Places by Margaret Doody, review: ‘exuberant’ – Telegraph

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Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle in the 1995 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice Photo: Moviestore Collection Ltd / Alamy

Jane Austen’s Names: Riddles, Persons, Places by Margaret Doody, review: ‘exuberant’ – Telegraph.

‘What’s in a name?” shrugs Shakespeare’s Juliet. Margaret Doody, an American academic, would explain. A name is a story with a complex history; names are rooted to place, to religion, to politics. They can be games or puns; in Jane Austen’s hands a name can be poem. In her examination of the names of people and places in Austen’s novels, Doody uncovers new levels of complexity and comedy, and suggests that the nation’s favourite author was less a realist than a surrealist.”

Post One: Reading Month 2015

A review of a book review of arguably one of the most beloved author in English Literature History. It is also no secret that JA is my favourite author. :).

Appreciating Jane Austen

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Jane_Austen

Source: http://i825.photobucket.com/albums/ zz173/ emilianozapata333/Jane_Austen.jpg

 

Since today(December 16) would be my favourite author’s birthday if she was alive, I believe it is proper to have a review of the main seven novels.

The complete set is one of my favourites read, I love me some Jane Austen.

I love her writing became of the way she merges her story with excellent scenery writing. She writes her scenes so well, I can feel and see the atmosphere at Lyme in Persuasion, I can see the beauty of the surroundings of the cottage when the Dashwoods moves in Sense and Sensibility. The landscape was so beautiful when Catherine and the Thorpes went sightseeing and the oh so lovely scene where Henry Tilney and Catherine Morland were exchanging words on novel-writing in Northanger Abbey.

The age of the writing also draws me to Austen’s world. I love reading about people in a different time period from the 20st and 21th century. The older the setting the better, 18th and 19th century is just an interesting period where society etiquettes were so class structured. It is one aspect that shows up in all her novels. The Bertrams took Fanny into the family but she was kept on a class beneath Edmund, Julia, Tom and Maria in Mansfield Park. The Elliots with excepting Anne accepted Captain W into their circles in Bath only when he amassed a fortune on the sea in Persuasion.

Austen’s characters are some of the wackiest and best in English Literature. I am glad she did not shy away from characters who would make women blush behind their fans in their morning rooms. Maria Bertram and Henry Crawford from Mansfield park, Lady Susan Vernon from Lady Susan, Willoughby from Sense and Sensibility, Lydia Bennet and George Wickham from Pride and Prejudice. I am also appreciated of the men who were so devoted and loved their women: Captain W, Colonel Brandon, Mr. Darcy. The comical ones also added laughter and fits of vexation for me: Mr. Collins were just so ridiculous, I could not help but laugh at him in P&P but I just wish Mary in Persuasion would shut up and go away.

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