47 Ronin

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Kai “I will search for you through 1,000 worlds and 10,000 life times until I find you”

Mika “I will wait for you in all of them.”

 

The above is a scene from one of the best films that I watched in 2015 called ‘47 Ronin.’  It is a mixture of action, romance and ancient east history, all the titbits to make my heart happy.  Usually after such films, I wait for the wait for the credit showing the inspiration behind the story. It is them I learn that the film is based on real people/Ronin. Of course, I became intrigued so I a note to dig a bit on the life of the 47 Ronin and I share with you their story.

The 47 Ronin is a part of Samurai history still celebrated, a legend and historical event from 18th century Japanese culture.  Ronin means leaderless samurai; this is what happened to a group of 47 men.   Lord Assano, who was the federal lord and Lord Kamei, had the task of preparing a reception for the envoys of the Emperor in Edo.  Kira (a shotgunate official from the Emperor Edo) gave instructions to Assano and Lord Kamei; however Kira found the reception lacking.  He bothered Assano and Lord Kamei but eventually began favouring Lord Kamei. He harassed Assano to the point that Assano attacked Kira. Since Assano assaulted the court official although he did not kill him it was an offense to assault an official especially close to his home. Thus, Assano had to commit a ritual suicide. You can imagine how infuriated the people became, 47 samurai vowed revenge for their lord. They planned their attack for a year, on December 14th 1703; Kira met his fate of death. The 47 Ronin also committed a ritual suicide similar to their Lord Assano.

 

Every year on the 14th of December, thousands of visitors go to the grave site of the 47 Ronin to pay their respects. In addition, the Gishisai Festival honours the 47 Ronin every year on the same date in Ako City, Japan.

Bibliography

Chushingura, 47 Ronin -. Discover the Tale of the 47 Ronin. 13 December 2015 <http://www.47ronins.com/&gt;.

Encyclopedia, Wikipedia The Free. Forty-Seven Ronin. Last Modified 10 November 2015. 13 November 2015 <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forty-seven_Ronin&gt;.

Page, The Samurai Archives Japanese History. The 47 Ronin. 12 December 2015 <http://www.samurai-archives.com/ronin.html&gt;.

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